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What do you imagine unions will look like in the future why

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For the better part of four decades, workers have been more productive than ever, creating massive amounts of wealth—but rigged economic rules, unmitigated corporate greed and unrelenting political attacks have weakened our voices, stifled our wages and eroded our economic security. Yet as we write this report, a wave of collective action is sweeping the nation. Working people across industries and demographics are joining together for a better life. This conversation is happening around us, often without us.

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But we do know one thing for sure: The decisions policymakers make today will determine who controls that future and whether working people will thrive or struggle just to survive. Working with Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislators, I look forward to putting my years of experience in the labor movement fighting for the economic and workplace rights of Californians to work on helping to form policies that will build a sustainable future for decades to come. The goal: to deliver good jobs, fair wages and health care and retirement for all, regardless of how rapidly technological advances transform the workplace.

In fact, we have a critical role to play in the future. Nearly half of nonunion workers would join a union today if given the chance, according to a study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Institute for Work and Employment Research.

Seven in 10 millennials view unions positively, according to Pew Research. In the midst of a decade-long economic expansion, workers are not sharing equally in the prosperity.

The system is rigged to the advantage of the wealthy few and corporate interests at the expense of everyday working people. Wages are stagnant. Income inequality and job insecurity are soaring.

Workplace mistreatment is on the rise. Outdated and obsolete labor laws make it far too difficult for workers to form a union. Silicon Valley tech CEOs make billions while workers sleep in their vehicles. The fallout has been a crushing race to the bottom that erodes the American promise.

Now the growing use of artificial intelligence and robots Amazon already uses more than , robots in its U. Workers know they need a countervailing force: a strong labor movement that has their backs so they can stand together and stand up against CEOs trying to control our lives. Unions must do even more to play an active role in forging a future that lifts all workers.

In California, we are already making progress toward an equitable future. Working people should not be a footnote in an economy whose levers are too often pulled by corporate greed and new technologies. As we celebrate Labor Day this year, our movement is championing equal pay for women and people of color.

We are working to put an end to racial discrimination in the workplace and banning forced arbitration agreements that cheat workers out of essential rights.

We are fighting for job opportunities with good wages that put young people on a more promising path. The future of work is not a problem we can afford to put off until tomorrow. The future of work is now. To read his past commentaries for CalMatters, please click here and here. Want to submit a guest commentary or reaction to an article we wrote? You can find our submission guidelines here. Read Article. Photo illustration by Andyworks. We want to hear from you Want to submit a guest commentary or reaction to an article we wrote?

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A Future Without Unions Is a Terrifying Dystopia

A recent Forbes article described how business leaders are using new technologies, big data and analytics to do business, and yet, despite the apparent control and understanding this gives them over their environment, they are still confronted with the impacts of unpredictable economic shocks, volatility, ambiguity and complexity. The Forbes article defines foresight as an action-oriented practice whereby one becomes more aware and engages in creating and leading their own realities. Here at the European Trade Union Institute ETUI we regard foresight as a means of research that uses various methods to help an organisation to think ahead, so that it can shape, create and develop plausible and different futures. In short, foresight produces and uses data that organisations can then interpret to anticipate change.

This week, the supreme court hears a case that will probably decimate American unions by going after them in the one bastion they have left, the public sector. Unions, however, are compelled by law to provide certain services to all workers in unionized workplaces, whether they are union members or not.

But we do know one thing for sure: The decisions policymakers make today will determine who controls that future and whether working people will thrive or struggle just to survive. Working with Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislators, I look forward to putting my years of experience in the labor movement fighting for the economic and workplace rights of Californians to work on helping to form policies that will build a sustainable future for decades to come. The goal: to deliver good jobs, fair wages and health care and retirement for all, regardless of how rapidly technological advances transform the workplace. In fact, we have a critical role to play in the future.

Where Are the Workers When We Talk About the Future of Work?

For far too many, the land of opportunity has turned into a land of downsized hopes and shrunken mobility. As the stories above make clear, something is fundamentally broken in the way many American employers treat their workers. Too often employers show utter contempt for the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. But now millions of Americans are wondering what happened to that golden age of prosperity, to John F. Blue-collar whites gave Trump the margins he needed to win Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin and, with those states, overall victory. Though candidate Trump campaigned as a champion of workers, his administration has repeatedly sided with business over workers. It has scrapped numerous job safety regulations, pushed to take away health coverage from millions of families, and rolled back a rule that extended overtime pay to millions more workers. Many industrial relations experts put it another way: they say there has been an undeniable decline in worker voice, the effective ability of workers to speak up and the willingness of many employers to listen to what workers have to say. In their groundbreaking book on labor relations, What Do Unions Do?

The future of American unions hangs in the balance

Innovative applications of AI in hotel and restaurant settings may threaten jobs in these sectors. The McKinsey Global Institute forecasts that automation will, by , destroy more than 39 million jobs in the United States, while two Oxford professors estimate that 47 percent of U. By contrast, there are plenty of seats for billionaire investors, millionaire executives, as well as consultants and technology gurus. It often seems that the corporate executives rushing to introduce artificial intelligence, robots, and other new technologies plan to give workers as much say in these matters as zoo managers give to the animals about revamping a zoo. Just 1.

On the face of it you might think that the future is full of potential for trade unions. Public concerns over low pay have soared to record levels over recent years.

Report Unions and Labor Standards. Download PDF. Press release. Americans have always joined together—whether in parent teacher associations or local community organizations—to solve problems and make changes that improve their lives and their communities.

How the internet and iPhone have changed our connection to each other and the information available to us in seconds, is a drop in the bucket to the disruptive changes coming. This is going to be a wonderful ride if youre prepared for it! Cini is the founder and CEO of www.

Image by Lia Kantrowitz. It's mid-afternoon in late June two decades from now, and the weather in New York City is gross: hot, humid, slimy. You're trying to find your way to a job interview when you pass a child yanking on her father's arm, confused by a throng of people marching in a circle in front of them. They seem angry—there's a lot of yelling and chanting and jockeying going on—but the most confusing part, at least to the toddler's eye, is a giant inflatable rat. You know what it is, of course.

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Aug 22, - Here's why trade unions should practice foresight to shape the future of work they are still confronted with the impacts of unpredictable economic shocks, and it's certainly not the modern equivalent of looking into a crystal ball. of whom feel the need to invent and imagine their own long-term future.

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